Members of the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan (PDKI) gather during a funeral of victims who were killed in a bomb attack at the offices of the PDKI in Koy Sanjak, east of Erbil, Iraq, December 21, 2016. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari

December 22, 2016

Iraqi Kurdish sources reported that six people were killed in a bomb attack at offices of Iranian Kurdish opposition north Iraq on Tuesday.

The bombing targeted the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan (PDKI) in Koy Sanjaq, east of Erbil, the capital of the autonomous Iraqi Kurdish region.

In this context, PDKI representative Mawloud Swarah told Asharq al-Awsat that the blast targeted an annual ceremony on the birthday of Abdulrahman Ghassemlou, Secretary General of the PDKI, knowing that he was assassinated by the Iranian intelligence in July 1989 in Vienna, Austria.

Swarah accused the Iranian intelligence of the dual blast, “Tehran is trying to target the party’s activities through conducting terrorist actions.”

“Two blasts blew and unfortunately five of the Peshmerga Forces were killed and one individual from the local police—some were injured too,” PDKI central committee member Hassan Zadeh said.

“There is no doubt that it’s the Iranian regime,” added Zadeh.

For its part, Kurdistan Regional government denounced the two blasts and pledged “to exert all efforts and potentials so that committers of this terrorist murder get punished.”

The party announced resumption of military operations against Iran last summer– In June and July, PDKI fighters fought Iranian Revolutionary Guards in northwestern Iran, with several killed on both sides.

Iranian Kurds represent seven million, around 10% of the total population in Iran. However, the majority reside in Kurdistan, on the Iraqi northern border with Iran.

Asharq Al-Awsat

About Track Persia

Track Persia is a Platform run by dedicated analysts who spend much of their time researching the Middle East, in due process we fall upon many indications of growing expansionary ambitions on the part of Iran in the MENA region and the wider Islamic world. These ambitions commonly increase tensions and undermine stability.